Expert Views

Challenges and solutions to nowcasting for Africa

By Dr Alexander Roberts, National Centre for Atmospheric Research and University of Leeds A new study outlines the challenges in delivering short-term weather warnings in Africa, called nowcasting, and proposes ways solutions can be provided in the coming years. A recent GCRF African SWIFT paper published in the Royal Meteorological Society Journal Weather details approaches … Continue Reading

How a satellite dish can save lives: Ghana advances nowcasting to improve early weather warnings

By Dr. Jeffrey Nii Armah Aryee, Lecturer and Researcher at KNUST, Kumasi, Ghana Accurate weather forecasting is an essential tool of modern society, which brings benefit to human safety and livelihoods, along with economic development and prosperity. The Nowcasting Satellite Facility (NWC-SAF) provides various products that are useful for improving nowcasting potential in Africa. Ghana … Continue Reading

Satellite observations hold key to Africa’s short-range weather forecasts

By Dr Peter Hill, University of Reading New research demonstrates that satellite observations across Africa can be used to provide valuable forecasts of storm evolution in subsequent hours. Large populations in tropical Africa are vulnerable to severe weather, often caused by intense storms that can generate heavy rainfall, strong winds and flooding. Forecasts can be … Continue Reading

Partnership improves weather and climate services across Central Africa

By Joshua Talib (UKCEH), Cheikh Dione (ACMAD) and Pascal Moudi Igri (CACP-AC) for African SWIFT In May 2015 the Central African Climate Application and Prediction Centre (CACP-AC) was formed in Cameroon to provide the latest weather forecast products and climate services to countries in the Economic Community of Central African States (ECCAS). ECCAS contains eleven … Continue Reading

The Science Behind Abuja’s Summer Flood

By Dr Kamoru Abiodun Lawal (NiMet) for GCRF-African SWIFT On 25 July 2020 Abuja city, Nigeria’s capital, experienced one of the worst floods in its history. This event was a consequence of build-up of clusters of mesoscale convective systems that started as early as the morning of 22 July 2020, through and up to 25 … Continue Reading